How many deaths this week from Citalopram?

 How many more people will this drug kill before someone puts a stop to this madness?

Here’s another four stories I have come across lately. Citalopram seems to be increasingly effective as a depressant.

How many people has it killed today and why is the IMB allowed to pass the blame with ridiculous statements like “the risk outweigh the benefits”? You think…

May 13, 2011. Katie Lumb, 23, A promising medical student who battled with an eating disorder died when her severely-emaciated body failed to cope with anti-depressants prescribed by her GP mother, a Leeds inquest has heard. Recording a narrative verdict, West Yorkshire coroner David Hinchliff said: ‘A post mortem examination shows the cause of death to be citalopram toxicity. Link.

February 2010, Martin Boyle, 40, soaked himself in petrol and threatened to ignite the fumes during a siege at his home. He later fell unconscious and was pronounced dead on arrival at hospital. Home Office pathologist Dr Naomi Carter gave the cause of death as ‘acute alcohol toxicity enhanced by citalopram’. Link.

September 22, 2011. John Eyre, 47, a Former Royal Navy officer died after choking on his own vomit following a heavy drinking session. Coroner, Geoffrey Saul, said: “He [John Russell Eyre] died following aspiration of gastric contents due to alcoholic intoxication and the effects of citalopram.” Link.

October 15 2008, Cyril Aldridge, 59, a dad of four, took a fatal overdose of his anti-depressant drug Citalopram before hanging himself from the loft space of his home in Noake Road, Hucclecote. Pathologist Dr John McCarthy said death was due to hanging. Blood and urine samples revealed he had two-and-a-half times the alcohol limit for a driver in his body and a toxic level of his Citalopram medication. Link.

Probably should add these people to the hall of shame. https://leoniefennell.wordpress.com/2012/01/08/lundbecks-hall-of-shame/

20 thoughts on “How many deaths this week from Citalopram?

  1. Most of the people on this blog who have died from an ssri induced suicide or death had nothing to do with alcohol consumption. It just happened that 3 of the 4 above had consumed alcohol but I can assure you, this is the exception rather than the rule. Shane did not drink. However, it is normal for the drug companies to blame the person and not the drug.
    Leonie

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  2. Any pill is poison..Immune system must work insanely hard to get it out though it doesn’t necessarily mean all of of the poison ever fully leaves the body..all about nutrition and the right vitamins..go organic-vegan for a month and watch life begin and disease die.

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  3. My husband died January 20, 2014. I just received the death certificate today and the cause of death was suicide/citalopram overdose. He was not drinking alcohol.
    Why if there are so many deaths and giant warnings of increased idealization of suicide as a side effect is this drug being used as an ANTIDEPRESSENT? Seems kind of counterproductive to me.

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    1. Hi Cathryn,
      I am so sorry to hear of your husband’s death. Sadly he is one of many to Citalopram and similar SSRIs. These drugs were sold to doctors as being ‘safer’ than the older tricyclics antidepressants, particularly in overdose. As you have found out, they are not safer; they double the risk of suicide and violence, particularly upon starting, discontinuing or dosage change (up or down).
      I have no idea why these drugs are used as an antidepressant – they leave so much death and distruction in their wake. If there is anything I can do to help, contacts etc, please shout. You can e-mail me at leoniefen@gmail.com
      Again, I am so very sorry that this happened to you and your husband.
      Leonie xxx

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  4. First off, I’ve been on Citalopram for years so I know it well.
    I have suffered with depression since my child was murdered in 1999 and have changed meds a few times over the years so unlike 90% of internet users who add to websites I do know what I’m talking about.

    You can’t blame an antidepressant for suicides, one of the key issues with depression at it’s worst is SUICIDAL THOUGHTS… the drug has merely failed to make the patient feel better not pushed them over the edge, if life was so f****ing rosey she/he wouldn’t need them to start with.

    As for the mixing with booze thing, I’ve been playing Russian Roulette with that one for a while…… very silly.

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  5. Hi Mike,

    First off, let me say that I’m so very sorry for what happened to you, your family and your child. No-one should ever have to experience the death of a child, particularly in such horrific circumstances.

    I’m glad you find citalopram to be of help; my son died because of citalopram, so I am speaking of my son’s and my family’s experience. I have no doubt that he would be alive if it wasn’t for 17 days of citalopram. As for suicide, the jury at my son’s inquest rejected a ‘suicide’ verdict due to his consumption of this drug, which was prescribed by a doctor. Professor David Healy testified that the drug had caused my son to take his own life and tragically the life of another young man.

    The key issue with depression is suicidal thoughts, agreed. The key issue with SSRI antidepressants is that they double the risk of suicide upon starting, discontinuing and dosage change (up or down). A side-effect of SSRIs, particularly citalopram, is that they can actually cause worsening depression. They can also cause akathisia, suicide, violence and mania.
    Another contradiction to ‘it’s the depression not the drug’ is that they have been known to cause suicide and violence in perfectly healthy people. These drugs are not just used just for depression, they are used for pain, hot flushes, bedwetting, exam nerves etc – so the importance of being fully informed can never be understated.

    As I said, I’m so glad that you feel this drug is working for you. Sadly, it doesn’t change the fact that it killed my son. Shane, by the way, never drank alcohol. Another issue is that he was never diagnosed with any ‘disorder’ including depression and was prescribed citalopram for a relationship break-up.

    It’s never recommended to abruptly withdraw from any of these SSRIs as it can lead to withdrawal and the side-effects mentioned above.

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    1. Mike..

      Not that all users of anti-depressants will have suicidal reactions, and not all people who have depression will commit suicide, but meds for depression can increase and exacerbate the suicide risk for some, and the danger is that it is close to impossible to identify who will not be able to tolerate SSRI’s. SSRI’s definitely made me much worse, but for I don’t doubt that some people are able to tolerate them more than others- but I think in the long term- and for long term use- SSRI’s and psych drugs in general just perpetuate the illness and make it chronic… Robert Whitaker’s ‘Anatomy of an epidemic’ is a good book on that subject if you haven’t read it.. all the best…

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    2. My brother shot and killed himself on June 14, 2014. We did not know it but he had been taking the prescription citalopram. Although he apparently had been depressed, there is no indication that he was suicidal prior to taking the prescription. I believe that the drug caused him to take his life. He was healthy, relatively young (50), had a good job, and had many friends and family who loved him. From what I have read, this prescription is more likely to cause suicidal thoughts in men. In that case, why do they prescribe it to men?

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      1. Hi Sharon,
        I’m so sorry to hear about your brother. I honestly don’t know why doctor’s prescribe SSRIs, unless as a last resort for severe depression, and only if nothing else has worked. The risks are too great as shown in my son’s case, your brothers and countless others.
        I assume you have seen this FDA Citalopram download – http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm088568.pdf

        Please let me know if you need any information: leoniefen@gmail.com
        Again my condolences for the loss of your lovely brother.
        Leonie

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  6. I just lost my Dad 4.5 months ago. He was 58. Death was ruled a suicide by ingesting toxic levels of Citalopram. The report came back at 0.4 mg/litre (blood toxicity level) which is just above normal (0.3 mg/litre is normal). She said the levels were probably much higher when he died but once the autopsy was done the levels came down. I was hoping for more validation than that.

    My Dad suffered for years with major depression and anxiety and was prescribed many different medications over 8 years including anti-psychotics on occasion. He just never got better. We knew he had depression but not to the extent of taking his own life. He hid everything from us and completely isolated himself. He had one friend, an alcoholic crazy woman whom he hung out with every day. She told me he was possessed by a demon that wanted to kill him and it finally happened. He believed this as well after reading his hospital records. This has been the most heart breaking thing to go through. I’m so sorry to those who have lost loved ones to suicide. The guilt and regret is just horrible.

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  7. people on celexa, for the love of God Almighty get off this drug, it is re wiring so many people, their emotions are cold never the same, they are not the same person that God intended them to be. Why people choose to take a drug for so many yrs. after 5yrs the person is nev’er the same so the rest of their family members have to watch them self destruct. It is like cocaine, once they are on it they are hooked for life. Be Courageous get off the devil’s drug. it is killing you all slowly. Based on studies it is hell getting off so why create another hell on earth you are all doing the devil’s work based on addiction.

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  8. My mother who suffered dementia was given citalopram in hospital. She was docile and should not have been prescribed the drug. She was 90 and suffering from malnutrition. She died and they could not determine the cause of death. ethanol was found in her system but she never drank.

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    1. Hi Robert. Sorry about your mom. The HPRA also have 90(ish) year-old-woman on their system, reported to have died on the day she was prescribed Citalopram. Why anyone would prescribe this drug in the elderly is beyond my comprehension.
      I wasn’t sure about how the Ethanol could have appeared in her system, so I asked an expert. It is apparently not uncommon for ethanol to be produced by bacterial fermentation at post-mortem. Hope that helps Robert.

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      1. Thanks lLonie..we had the inquest and a superblative coroner. The Doctor admitted they administered the wrong medicine ( citalopram)and admitted that it had strong side effects. if as a teacher I did that I would be sacked…how should I procceed.

        Robert

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      2. So true. I don’t know how you would proceed – it really depends on what you want and what country you live in I suppose. A good solicitor will advise you. I think most people just want answers, an apology and reassurance that it won’t happen to anyone else. Maybe you could set up a meeting with the hospital board and see how you get on?

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      3. We must have boundaries,and make our own decisions.It is up to us to ensure that we stay in charge.Stop believing lies.Say no is a power nobody can take away from you.Keep asking questions,unaware life is not worth living the legacy of Greek philosopher,Socrates is very much alive.
        The experts become experts only if you give them power.
        Social psychologist Gordon Allport In spite of progress in the field of mastery over energy control physical and premature death,we appear to living in the stone age so far as our handling our human relationships.This assessment is still correct Humanity still living in the stone age of its ability to reduce or eliminate racial or ethnic oppression. Too much power is not good for anybody.

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