psychiatry, Random, Shanes story.

Well-Being Foundation Award

The Well-Being Foundation: “It’s that time of year. Time mag, the IT, the Grauniad, they all do it. We’re not great ones for PoY awards, partly because they exclude so many deserving people, but for once — Leonie Fennell is our Woman of the Year. Hero!” 

Photo Courtesy of Caroline
Photo Courtesy of Caroline

Aw shucks! I’m not quite sure what to say here, except – I’m very proud to accept the ‘Woman of the Year’ award from the Well-Being Foundation. This Foundation was set up by Dr Michael Corry and his partner Aine Tubridy.

Taken from the Well-being website following Dr Corry’s death on 22/02/2010 – “If opposition is any sign, then Michael’s campaigns certainly rattled the ‘great and the good’ of Irish psychiatry. Professor Patricia Casey sued him and RTE for libel in 2005, a case settled by the broadcaster, and Professor Ted Dinan of UCC made a complaint to the Fitness to Practice Committee of the IMC over his public comments on the role of SSRIs (in Shane’s case).” Ah yes, so no surprises there then!

It was a pleasure to meet both of these lovely people, albeit, it goes without saying that I wish it was under different circumstances. I accept this award with enormous pride on behalf of myself and Shane, particularly as it’s coming from the Well-being Foundation. Thank you, and rest in Peace Dr Corry and Aíne Tubridy!

Cuba 12

Dr Corry and Aine Tubridy

Newspaper and internet articles, Random

Declan Henry – Why Bipolar?

Why BipolarDeclan Henry – Why Bipolar?

I have just finished reading ‘Why Bipolar’, a book by Irish author Declan Henry. The purpose of the book is to demystify ‘Bipolar disorder’, the ‘condition’ formerly known as Manic Depression.

This is a great read; a collection of 26 individual stories of people who have had a Bipolar diagnosis. The fact that there are different stories make it a very easy read as it can be put down and read again at leisure. It was lovely to read about my hero Doctor Michael Corry who got a mention in one of the stories. Mary Maddock of MindFreedom Ireland, another hero of mine and a lovely lady, wrote the concluding section of ‘Why Bipolar’ quite beautifully.

Sometimes the stories were harrowing but equally, maybe unintentionally, some were very funny. Wouldn’t it be nice to be ‘mad’ for a day, go on a spending spree, say what you think to whoever you wish and  do exactly what takes your fancy? Going by these stories, not really. Reality will always break through and come crashing round your ankles. Not good!

As I suppose with life, the people were all shapes and sizes, ranging from annoying, sad, self-absorbed to kind, funny and enormously likeable. Most of the 26 people in the book gave account of their diagnosis and again most had been medicated with varying amounts of psychiatric drugs. The strange thing is, that with the exception of one person, the drugs made no difference or made the symptoms much worse.

The takeaway message here is that the pharmaceutical industry is making a mint out of drugs that don’t work, for a condition which may or may not exist. Even worse – the drugs can cause permanent debilitating adverse effects in an already vulnerable person. Anyway, it’s a great read and highly recommended. One last point I took away from this book – if anyone says ‘let me be nice to you‘- RUN!!

Random

Medicating a non-existent disease.

Here’s a recent clip of Sinead O’Connor speaking on her treatment by an Irish Psychiatrist. Sinead says that she was misdiagnosed with Bipolar Disorder and subsequently prescribed ‘toxic’ doses of Lamictal (400mgs) and Amitriptyline (200mgs). She describes her psychiatrist as a horrible ‘b’ who did not inform her of the side-effects while on the drugs, or while coming off them.

Dishing out the pills is always the first-line treatment for people that psychiatry see as ‘abnormal’. Sinead O’Connor is perfectly normal by the way, and fabulously outspoken; she didn’t need fixing! Strange that dangerous drugs can be given to a person for years for an ‘illness’ which didn’t exist. Never mind all that comes with that, not least the weight gain, depersonalization, worsening depression and huge expense; would any other profession get away with such sloppy work? Reported adverse effects of these drugs on the RxISK website: Lamictal and Amitriptyline.

The full video can be viewed here.

Cases, Newspaper and internet articles, psychiatry

Ireland’s continuing abuse of children.

Help meAn article yesterday in the Irish Times regarding asylums in Ireland makes for very disturbing reading.

Dr Damien Brennan of Trinity College Dublin has recently launched a book detailing Ireland’s ‘mental health’ structure, then and now; Irish Insanity: 1800-2000 .

Dr Brennan worked as a mental health nurse in St Loman’s, Grangegorman and Portrane. He said “there was a harshness and dehumanising aspect that was very much like the Magdalene laundry.” 

Here’s a couple of the more disturbing facts in this article:

(1) Medical professionals and local communities protecting their economic interests played a major role in the incarceration of tens of thousands of people in (Irish) asylums.

(2) Point 1 above- can’t be blamed on the church; it was a State-run project. We did it as communities, as societies.

(3) Ireland in the 1950s had the world’s highest rate of mental hospital residency.

(4) Point 3 above – had little to do with the mental state of the admitted individuals. Rather, it was driven by factors such as law, economics and vested interests, including the creation of a medical treatment hierarchy that continues today.

(5) The staff had a stake in this. The medics and nurses had their professional interests in this. Economically, it became very important.

And the most disturbing points:

(6) One definite factor he said was the “medical takeover of hospitals” in the mid-19th century. “Medics gained control of inspections, directors and clinical positions and that maintains today – even post Vision for Change.”

(7) “I would be concerned about new markets of diagnosis being opened up, for example, the diagnosis of attention deficit disorder. You find schools will get resources where it is diagnosed, and that’s a poor dynamic. It reminds me of the mental hospital system expanding as a business, on the basis of continued diagnosis.”

(8) “The current State policy on mental healthcare was written by an expert group comprising two service users, a chairperson and 15 members of professional bodies. Vision for Change gave them an opportunity to write their job descriptions in the post-institutional phase.” and further “The fact that we go to these professional groups, myself included, as the initial point of contact – I’m not sure how useful that is.”

So this could never happen in 2013, right? Wrong, and we are allowing it to continue; yes – you, me and every Irish citizen who sit back and allow these so-called professionals to incarcerate a young (16 year old) girl against her will and medicate her to the point of incapacity against her mother’s wishes. This case is on-going in High Court proceedings – The Mother v HSE Psychiatrists (author’s case name). Where is this young girl’s human rights. What human rights does the mother have in protecting her child? None it seems! We are allowing these so-called HSE professionals to violate this young girl’s body with harmful and life-threatening dangerous drugs. She was never in danger of hurting herself (or anyone else for that matter). For a insight into which dangerous drugs this girl was prescribed, see my previous post here.

The dubious actions by the HSE using an ex-parte procedure was described by the High Court Judge as “a very frail procedure, putting it at its mildest.” Let us not forget that this is a test-case and will set a precedent for every mother or parent who seeks help for their child in a HSE run institute. I do hope that this girl will not end up as another statistic in the next report on HSE deaths.

In July (Irish Times) the mother told Justice George Birmingham (in the High Court) that “her daughter walks like a 70-year-old woman since anti-psychotic drugs were administered to her”. She said her daughter was hunched over, her arms were stiff at her side and she was shuffling along when she visited her.

Last Thursday (24th October) the case came up again. Justice Birmingham said that all the existing orders, including those allowing the use of anti-psychotic drugs, should be continued (Irish Times). He said he would hear the matter again on December 5th.

This week our ‘Minister for Justice’ Alan Shatter has ordered an independent report into two cases where Roma children were removed from their parents by the gardai (over doubts about their parentage) and rightly so. What about a young 16 year old who is incarcerated by the HSE and pumped with mind-altering dangerous drugs? Surely an investigation is warranted here too?

BTW, I should probably make myself clear; I have the utmost respect for Alan Shatter. I don’t always agree with his decisions, but I think he’s a good man, not like the other dubious Ministers I could mention, but won’t. Maybe I should brush up on the auld defamation law. Truth and honest opinion can only go so far!

Newspaper and internet articles, Our story., Random

Wicklow Casper Conference

PresentationWell, I did it. I survived the conference with Maria, I didn’t run out the side door and she didn’t have to slap me; well not too hard anyway. Maria was fabulous and I couldn’t have asked for a more experienced ally.

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She was able to give people a real feel for her son Toran, along with an abundance of science behind drug-induced deaths. The stories we heard on Saturday were tragic and very avoidable, but hopefully we can inform the future generation and stop the madness that SSRIs are inducing. 

Maria is the CEO of Casper NZ. New statistics have shown that in the groups which Casper has helped, there has been a 20% reduction in deaths by suicide. For young people that is a stunning reversal, because in the previous year there had been a 45% increase in 15-19 year olds taking their own lives. That has never been done in Ireland and we need to take notice. Despite all the suicide awareness groups, pharma funded and otherwise, the suicide rate in this country is huge. Maria has been asked to speak in other countries including Dubai, The Cook Islands, Australia and the US. I have no doubt she is making a difference; can we possibly ignore these results or will we just keep over-prescribing the unhappy pills which double the risk of suicide and violence?

PS. Thank you so much to everyone who made a huge effort to attend, from all over the country and indeed from across the water. I am humbled! Video to follow once my son Jake gets his act together and posts to Youtube.

cipramil (celexa) stories,, lundbeck

Be Aware/Beware of Lundbeck’s ’99 and me’

Shane, Lucy and ChrissyLundbeck, your not so friendly Pharma company are at it again in the Irish Isles. This time it’s the launch of a ‘new bipolar disorder campaign’ 99 and me.

What does the ’99 and me’ leaflet tell us? Well, let’s see: “Seeking help for symptoms of bipolar disorder is no cause for worry. Approximately 40,000 people in Ireland are currently being treated for the condition – that is approximately 1 in every 100 people in the country. Your healthcare professional is always on-hand to offer friendly advice and support. They can advise you on the right treatment pathway to suit you.”

The campaign, according to IrishHealth.com, “aims to tackle misunderstandings about the condition, to remove the stigma surrounding it and to encourage people to get the treatment they need as soon as possible.” Dr Paul Scully of St James’s Hospital stated “not infrequently, bipolar can be misdiagnosed as depression and, as a result, patients don’t receive the treatment and support they need“.

Naturally Lundbeck have a treatment for bi-polar disorder. Unfortunately the treatment may be worse than the cure; will your hands-on friendly healthcare professional tell you that? Firstly there is Sycrest/Saphris which lists Akathisia as a ‘common’ side effect. Akathisia, you may know, is well known as the precursor to suicide and/or homicide.

Then there is Abilify. According to PharmaTimes the ‘National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’ (NICE) “has issued draft guidance recommending Lundbeck/Otsuka’s Abilify for the treatment of teenagers with bipolar disorder.” Remember Akathisia, particularly if this drug is prescribed to your teenager. The RxISK database has 348 reported deaths, 573 cases of Akathisia, 572 cases of Psychotic disorder, 381 cases of Agitation, 351 cases of Schizophrenia, 303 cases of mania, 303 cases of Delusion, 292 cases of Hallucination, 295 Suicide attempts, 293 Completed suicide and 276 cases of Aggression, all directly reported as an adverse effect of consuming Abilify. I could go on but you can have a look for yourself: RxISK (Abilify)

At the moment there is a Bi-polar Conference (13-16 June) ongoing in Florida. It’s called the ’10th International Conference on Bipolar Disorders’ and the listed disclosures would make your hair stand on end, here. Interesting to see the notorious pharma shill Charles Nemeroff in attendance. Despite the numerous conflicts of interest, at least in the US pharma declarations are listed, where-as Irish Psychiatrists and Doctors seem quite reticent in revealing their pharma connections. It would certainly be interesting to see what pharma connections, if any, Dr Paul Scully of St James’s Hospital has, including Lundbeck honoraria.

It should be noted; in my experience, if you or your loved one happen to have an adverse reaction (as listed above), your hands-on friendly GP will side with the pharmaceutical industry and turn their backs on you quicker than you can say ‘Judas Iscariot’.

cipramil (celexa) stories,, lundbeck, Newspaper and internet articles

When is a suicide not a suicide?

@AntiDepAware

This blog was written by Brian today. His blog ‘AntiDepAware‘ is such a revelation. His knowledge on prescription drug-induced deaths, coupled with brilliant investigational skills, surpasses no-one that I’m aware of.

It may come as no surprise that most of the victims in this particular blog were on Citalopram. Despite drug companies admitting that antidepressants (SSRIs in particular) can cause a person to commit suicide, Coroners seem to be lagging way behind in informing themselves. Have a read for yourselves:

When is a suicide not a suicide?

Robert Keywood was married and had two daughters, lived in Kent, and worked for Kimberley-Clark as director of human resources.

A few weeks before his death, he had travelled to Poland and America on business and was having trouble sleeping. He went to see his GP, and was prescribed sleeping tablets and antidepressants.

One Friday last November, Mr Keywood drove to the Pentagon shopping centre in Chatham, where he took his own life by jumping from the top of the multi-storey car park (right). A note left on the passenger seat of his car read: “You’re better off without me, love Bob.”Multi story

Ann, his wife of almost 30 years, told the inquest her husband had acted “agitated” and “out of character” on a number of occasions before he died.

CoronerDeputy assistant coroner Alison Summers (left) said, “One gleans some insight into a particular person’s life and it’s clear to me this was very out of character,” before recording a verdict of suicide.

To give a verdict of suicide, a coroner needs to be certain that the person intended to kill himself or herself. Often, the existence of a written note is regarded as evidence of intent. In this case, Mr Keywood had written just seven words on a piece of paper left in his car.

In a case where medication could well be the cause, however, it is surely relevant to ask the question: “Would the person have killed him/herself if he/she had not been taking medication?” In this case, like so many before it, Mr Keywood had no recorded history of depression, and only began to act agitated and out of character after having been prescribed medication. From the newspaper report, it would appear probable that an adverse reaction to antidepressants was responsible for Mr Keyword’s death. Therefore, unless there are circumstances that have gone unreported, suicide may not be the correct verdict in this case.

Like Mr Keywood, Trina Clinton, a 54-year-old housewife from Redditch, took her life by falling from a multi-storey car park in March 2005. Worcestershire Coroner Victor Round originally recorded a verdict of suicide but told the court that a blood test revealed the prescribed antidepressant Citalopram in Mrs Clinton’s blood.

After Mrs Clinton’s sister-in-law said that the antidepressant “must have been a contributory factor”, Mr Round changed the verdict to “suicide while under medication”. He then modified his verdict again to record an open verdict.

In the same month, Carwyn Lewisa 38-year-old air steward from Carmarthen, was found dead in a bath full of water with a travel case full of books on top of him. He had been suffering from depression for some time.

But the coroner said he could not record a verdict of suicide because of the possible side-effects of the antidepressant drugs that Mr Lewis had been taking. He recorded an open verdict.

Ian Fox, a 65-year-old retired postal worker from Edgware, died in July 2008 after throwing himself in front of a train at Finchley Road Tube station.

He had been prescribed the antidepressant Citalopram for just one month before taking his life and he had expressed a wish to come off it, complaining of confusion and anxiety.

At his inquest, Mr Fox’s wife blamed her husband’s sudden death on the medication, saying that her husband’s action was completely out of character. She described how, until he began taking Citalopram, he had only been suffering from mild depression, brought on by retirement from his job and a foot injury.

Coroner Dr Andrew Reid recorded a narrative verdict in which he accepted that Mr Fox had jumped in front of the train, but added: “I’m satisfied he did so while the balance of his mind was disturbed while suffering the adverse effects of Citalopram.”

Brian PalmerIn September 2011, self-employed electrician Brian Palmer (left), 63, from Littlehampton, visited his GP as a consequence of financial worries. He was prescribed Fluoxetine (Prozac) and Zopiclone. A few days later, Mr Palmer shot himself.

At the inquest, Mr Palmer’s widow Jennifer told the inquest that days after Mr Palmer began taking the drugs, his mental health deteriorated. She said: “I noticed a change in him almost straight after taking the pills. I asked to see the box in the days before but he said he couldn’t find it. I found it a few days after his death and it listed all the changes I had seen in him. My heart just stopped. I didn’t go down there with him, when he picked up the prescription – I wish I had. We have had to learn the hard way. I can’t bear to think of any other families going through this kind of trauma.”

Coroner Penelope Schofield recorded a narrative verdict, in which she concluded that Mr Palmer took his own life following the prescription of antidepressant pills.

In each of the four cases above, the deaths have been linked to the victims’ reactions to antidepressant medication. Yet two of the cases resulted in open verdicts, while in the other two, narrative verdicts were recorded.

My database also contains cases where coroners have turned a deaf ear to evidence pertaining to reaction to antidepressants. This was particularly noticeable in inquests into the Bridgend hangings.

At the inquest of Christopher Ward, for example, a police officer provided the information that 29 year-old Mr Ward “had been prescribed Citalopram for depression.” Even so, Coroner Peter Maddox declared that: “There was a lack of anything in the system that would have altered his judgement, you would expect him to understand what he was doing and the consequences,” said Mr Maddox. “I can’t ignore the circumstances in which he was found, the toxicology results which suggests he was in control of his faculties.” Mr Maddox recorded a verdict of suicide, thus completely ignoring the possibility that Citalopram may have “altered his judgement”.

Lana WilliamsIn the case of 20 year-old mother Lana Williams (right), her fiancé said she had seemed “in good spirits” when he had left the house for work on the morning of her death. A police officer reported that “although Miss Williams had suffered post-natal depression, for which she was still taking medication, there was no other history of mental health problems.” After hearing the evidence, “Coroner Peter Maddox said he thought an appropriate verdict was that Lana Williams took her own life.”

It has been proposed that there should be a separate verdict for those who have taken their lives while under the influence of prescribed medication. This would be a verdict of “Iatrogenic Suicide”, the word iatrogenesis being defined as an inadvertent adverse effect or complication resulting from medical treatment or advice. This would be supported by those who are concerned that suicide figures are underestimated due to the number of self-inflicted deaths registered as open or narrative verdicts.

On the other hand, Dr David Healy writes that: “If someone jumps to their death from a 10th floor balcony under the influence of LSD, unless there is clear evidence beforehand that this was what was planned, an open verdict would be more appropriate than a suicide verdict.”

SSRIs are capable of causing similarly tragic outcomes, and bereaved families who recognised that their loved one’s death was caused by a reaction to medication would be disappointed to receive a verdict of suicide in such cases.

Newspaper and internet articles

Psychiatric Meds and Mass Murder

Magic BulletThe Systemic Correlation Between Psychiatric Medications and Unprovoked Mass Murder in America.

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Here’s a very interesting paper: ‘The Systemic Correlation Between Psychiatric Medications and Unprovoked Mass Murder in America’ written by Jeanne M. Stolzer, Professor of Child and Adolescent Development at the University of Nebraska-Kearney in Nebraska. Click on the link at the top of the page to access the full pdf.

First paragraph…

“Since the beginning of the human race, violence has permeated every civilization in recorded history. However, over the last 10-15 years, violence of an unprecedented nature has become common place across America. Young male killers are opening fire in movie theatres, shopping malls, and schools with no apparent motivation. Innocent six- and seven-year-old American children are shot to death as they sit in their first grade classrooms. We as a nation are stunned, despondent, and angry. How could this happen? Why is this happening? How can we prevent such tragedy from occurring in the future? On December 17, 2012, President Barack Obama addressed the nation at a memorial service for the 20 first grade children and the six school employees who were shot to death at a public school in Newtown, Connecticut. The president of the United States consoled the American public and made it absolutely clear that change was needed in order to stop the senseless carnage that is occurring in America…….”

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Newspaper and internet articles, Random

My sister Lori.

Lori

This is Lisa’s story of the sudden and tragic death of her sister Lori in 1981. Lori was 25 years old and Lisa was 13. It took almost 3 decades for Lisa to find out the truth about her sister’s death. Here is Lisa’s story:

My sister Lori Died Suddenly on Sept. 22, 1981. She was 25 years old. I always knew my Sister’s sudden death was suspicious. I had searched for years for the answers to why, which included contacting the police department, and going over the report many times! Someone had to do this to her, she would not have killed herself! This I knew for sure! I would sit in my driveway where she lost her life, and look at my house many times over, and say how did you sit here, looking at our families home with your daughter, niece, sisters, and parents sleeping inside, how how could you have done this to us, and yourself?!

Nothing made sense then, and for the decades that followed. However, now almost three decades later “2009″ the truth has finally surfaced. I now have the answer I have searched for my entire life since that tragic morning I found her in her 1977 Buick with our father’s handgun in her lap. I promised her that morning I would not give up until I found the “truth” about what really happened to her. My sister loved life, and her family, and knew we loved her! She would not have taken her own life. So why did she?
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Summary of Lori’s Story:
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My sister moved home, and filed for divorce in 1980. I am her younger sister Lisa, and we spent most of this time together when she moved back home. I was going into the 8th grade that year. I was so happy that she was moving in with us, and that I would have time to spend with her. We were very close, very similar. Lori was a strong, smart woman, and she was determined to make it on her own! She worked for the county that we lived in, and was very well liked at her job. She also made enough money where she would be able to live. People that she worked with were shocked like everyone else was to hear about her sudden, so out of character death.
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At the time she lived with us she was doing fine, going to work everyday, and taking one day at a time to rebuild her life. Throughout her divorce it was stressful, just as much as expected in any divorce situation. It is a life change. Suddenly the last month to weeks of her life I noticed that she had changed. I listened, and I watched her suddenly turn into someone I did not know. I could not figure it out? Why was she acting like this? Saying these things to me? Finding it funny to scare me? Lori suddenly started to talk about death, and dying! In which she would include me in her plans/ideas on how I/We could end her life!
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Some examples are as follows:
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1. Lori would loop a belt around her neck, and ask me to pull it as hard as I could until she stopped breathing!
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2. Lori would ask me to come in the middle of the night, and put a pillow over her face to suffocate her in her sleep!
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3. Lori would lay still in her bed, and when she heard me coming down the hallway she would lay still, and pretend to be dead. When I shook her to wake her up she would not move. She stayed so still until she couldn’t anymore, and started to laugh out loud hysterically at me, and then would say to me “I’m just joking Lisa, I just wanted to see what it would feel like to really be dead, and what you would do if I really was?! Then she would go on to say to me, “you don’t have to worry I wouldn’t really do anything, I’m too chicken!”
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4. Lori suddenly changed by saying things to me like “HE” is in your room, closet and going to get you! Will you sleep with me in my room on the floor next to me? She also would say things that did not make sense like.. see this pin this will pop your face, see this curling iron, this will burn your face! It Never made sense the things she started to say..that was not her!
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5. Lori suddenly at times would go from laughing, and joking about something into anger, (suddenly she pushed me into a file cabinet, it, and myself fell on the ground) Lori never would hurt anyone, especially me;  agitated, and confused mood. (suddenly she would look at me with sadness in her eyes, and say to me I don’t know why I am saying or doing these things.. I must be going crazy.
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Lisa and Lori6. Something else happened shortly before her life ended in such a tragic horrific way. Lori suddenly became very sick she came down with the flu. She lost weight, she could not eat, drink, or get up out of bed she was very pale, and weak, frail looking. I felt so bad I could not help her feel better. I had never seen her so sick before. She could not hold food down and was growing weaker by the day.
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7. Lori also suddenly started to fall asleep with her bible on her face. As if she were reading. praying for help to feel better. I had to take the bible of her face a few times when she finally was able to sit still, and take a short nap.
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8. Lori’s sleeping patterns suddenly changed as well.
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9. The night before she died, I remember it so clear. Lori kept rocking in our rocking chair that we had in our living room. She would not stop! She also was talking much faster than usual, and walking much faster as well. When I finally asked her to stop rocking so fast she just looked at me like she couldn’t stop, or didn’t want to. It was like someone was pushing her to rock. I thought it very odd at the time but soon overlooked it because of all her sudden behaviors had been so altered lately that I almost was getting use to the changes.
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10. That night my sister’s were staying up to watch the Deer Hunter a movie that came out in the 80′s I believe. They wanted me to stay up also to watch it with them but I was tired, and only made through some of it. The Russian Roulette camp scene came up. Where each of the prisoners were made to put a loaded handgun to their heads, some chambers were full, some were not. Each prisoner was made to take a chance when it was their turn. If it was empty they lived. If it was not they died. Lori made the comment/question: Do you think if I did that it would work the first time? Then she laughed it off. Then she started talking about our German Shepherd Dog who was aging. Lori said what are we going to do with Champ when he dies? Then she said well it doesn’t matter, if we bury him the worms will eat him anyway! Again she laughed.
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Lori 2I went to bed soon after that part of the movie, I was very tired. Lori came into my bedroom late that night, and stood in my doorway. She was talking to me, and asked are you awake? I remember mumbling back to her yes, but was half asleep still. She looked at the last supper picture I had on the wall, and asked me who was so and so? I don’t remember the name she said. Then she went on to look at her daughters picture on my wall, and said aww, isn’t she so cute! Then the last thing she said to me was “Well I’ll see you in the morning ok?!” and off she went down the hallway, I heard the front door slam as it usually did behind her around that time of night. That night Lori was not sad, depressed, crying, or irritable, just sounded so full of life! Energized.
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I did not know it then, but that was the last time I would hear her voice. That early morning of September 22, 1981 I was getting ready for school. I went into her bedroom to borrow a shirt of hers, and I quietly asked her if I could borrow it? Lori did not answer, so I took it, and got ready to catch the bus. As I walked out the front door down our driveway I had to pass her car, from a far distance all I could see was the color RED. My first thought was “here she goes again, She is trying to fool me again, and this time it looks like she used Ketchup!
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Well as I got closer, I saw my sister through the car window, she was on her side with her head on the armrest of the passenger side door. I could see her face clearly, Her eyes were closed, and there was blood dripping from her mouth, and bottom lip onto the seat. Still I was in total disbelief. Our other sister ran back into the house right away, and was calling me to come with her. I stayed by the car window, pounding on the glass waiting for her move, or waiting for her to laugh because she fooled me again! She did not move, or laugh.
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Our father came out of the house, and broke the driver side window, unlocked the door and got inside the car, reached across Lori’s body to unlock the passenger side door, ran around the car as fast as he could, got in and picked her up to hold her. Lori’s body lay across my fathers lap, and he just kept repeating WHY?
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Lori3Our father came up to the house finally, hands and clothing full of blood, and said to me, your sister is gone. She had a open casket, I was not going to attend until a friend told me I should go say goodbye or I would regret it later. So I went. I finally went up to the casket where her body lay. All I could remember was the things she had said to me, and done those last weeks of her life. I was afraid, and confused to what had happened to her. It just never made sense! As I sat and looked across the room at her in the casket all I could think of was that this was not real. She was not Dead. She is pretending, etc. Even though In reality I did know she was gone. Just didn’t know why?!
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*Lori did not drink,smoke, or do drugs- We had no answers. No clues so we thought. So for decades her sudden change, which followed to her sudden death remained “suspicious!”
THE NOTE SHE LEFT BEHIND SAID:
“IT’S NOBODY’S FAULT, I JUST FLIPPED!”
:)
(WITH A SMILEY FACE AT THE BOTTOM.)
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Decades later the truth surfaced! Finally I was able to put it all together. In 2009 I was going through my sister’s box of things that I had packed away almost 28 years ago, off the top of her dresser. I came across many things I remembered from the time… one which included a medicine bottle. We knew Lori was put on a medicine to help her with the stress of her divorce, so it was not a surprise to me that I packed the bottle. Like I said we all knew she was taking something for anxiety. Back then it was similar to taking an advil. No big deal. As long as a doctor gave you something, it was ok to take. Safe.
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However..the shock came to me when I typed the name of the drug into the computer just months ago. Slowly it all started to come together, and I mean all of it! As I read the side effects of the medication she was on, it all suddenly linked! Including the things she said, the things she did, the rocking in the chair, the things she was seeing that were not there, and finally to the flu like symptoms that she was displaying shortly before she ended her life at the young age of 25.
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Lori 3NOW..EVEN THE NOTE SHE LEFT BEHIND MAKES SENSE!….SHE DID FLIP, LOST HER MIND, HOWEVER, SHE DID NOT KNOW IT WAS DUE TO THE CONCEALED SIDE EFFECTS OF A PRESCRIPTION DRUG SHE TOOK FOR JUST A FEW SHORT WEEKS!!
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HERE IS THE WARNING ON THIS SAME DRUG TODAY (2013):
Imipramine and Suicides:
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Your healthcare provider should monitor you (or your child) carefully when you are first starting an antidepressant. You should also be watchful for any signs of suicidal behavior. Contact your healthcare provider right away if you (or your child) have any of the following:
*Thoughts about death or *committing suicide, Suicide attempts, *Depression or anxiety that is new or worse, *Agitation, restlessness, or panic attacks
*Trouble sleeping (insomnia), *Irritability that is new or worse, *Aggressive, angry, or violent behavior, *Acting on dangerous impulses, *Unusually increased talking or activity*Akathisia
An analysis of a large clinical trial published in the British Journal of Psychiatry in 2008 estimated that up to 35 percent of people taking antipsychotic drugs experience akathisia.
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Symptoms include: Fidgety movements*, Leg swinging while sitting*, Rocking from foot to foot or pacing*, Motor restlessness; inability to sit still*, Feelings of anxiety*, Insomnia*. The combination of these symptoms and depression and impulsiveness may also contribute to aggression and suicide in some patients. Other strange changes in mood or behavior. (* I put a star next to every side effect she had!)
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BLACK BOX WARNING (2004)
http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/psn/transcript.cfm?show=34 Today we have commercials warning of these dangers. We also have computers where we can do our own research. Back then, we had nothing! Some say maybe no-one knew back then… Not true! Facts below:
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Pharmacosis:
* The first descriptions of a drug causing suicide came in 1955. A few years later in 1958 and again in 1959 the problem was described with imipramine.* Treatment induced suicide became a prominent media issue in 1990 with a paper by Teicher and Cole. (MY SISTER DID NOT HAVE TO DIE!) *It was not until 2004 that regulators and companies conceded that these drugs can cause a problem.
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Closure.
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In 2009 I was able to give our parents some kind of closure to Lori’s death, however, this in no way made up for the three plus decades of pain and suffering they as parents had to endure. Our Mother said: You mean she died because people had to be greedy, and make money? Our Father said: It don’t matter now, because she is gone, and nobody will care! HAD WE KNOWN THE CONCEALED SIDE EFFECTS OF IMIPRAMINE, MY SISTER WOULD BE ALIVE TODAY!
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WELL MY STORY IS NOW ONLINE, AND PEOPLE DO CARE, AND HOPEFULLY LIVES CAN BE SAVED BY READING HER STORY! IN LOVING MEMORY OF MY SISTER… SHE MAY NOW, AFTER ALMOST THREE DECADES, REST IN PEACE.
I LOVE YOU.
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To contact Lisa directly – lisagina68@aol.com
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Newspaper and internet articles, Shanes story.

Ireland’s over-prescribing disaster.

Ali Bracken
Ali Bracken

In 2009 following Shane’s death, a ‘Tribune’ journalist ‘Ali Bracken’ decided to find out whether antidepressants were being over-prescribed in Ireland. She presented to 5 doctors with symptoms of mild-depression and was shocked when 4 out of 5 prescribed her an antidepressant. The article ‘A Pill For Every Ill’ can be viewed here. So what has happened in the last 4 years. Has the over-prescribing of potentially dangerous drugs been curtailed in any way? Nope, in fact it’s actually got much, much worse.

In the last few weeks, a young journalism student ‘Niamh Drohan’ posed as a mildly depressed student in Waterford. This time sheNiamh Drohan visited 7 GPs as part of her investigation; all near Waterford city. Sadly, all 7 prescribed her an antidepressant. Her article ‘Depressing Truth about Treating Depression In The Young’ can be viewed here. What is all the more shocking this time around, is that 3 prescriptions were issued for one month supply, 1 was for two months, 1 was for three months and 2 were for six months. Can you believe that? Two doctors prescribed a 6 months supply of a potentially fatal amount of drug, to a depressed person that they had only just met? Why not just give her a gun and play some Russian Roulette with a young girl’s life? Idiots!

So why are Irish doctor’s prescribing so recklessly? The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines  recommend that doctors “Do not use antidepressants routinely to treat mild depression because the risk–benefit ratio is poor…” Another NICE review stated that the benefit of antidepressant medication compared with placebo in mild to moderate depression may be minimal or nonexistent.

What about the Irish Human Rights Commission who recommended, among other things, that doctors/psychiatrists are to give an ‘oral explanation of risks/side-effects of SSRI’s in advance of prescription, together with relevant written information’ and that a ‘level of monitoring and ongoing supervision is required when SSRI’s are initially prescribed’. I don’t think that equates to ‘here’s a script, now have a nice day young lady and don’t take them all at once’.

Considering Shane had access to 6 weeks of poison Citalopram and had a toxic-to-fatal level of same in his system when he died, how many horses could a 6 month supply kill? This dangerous over-prescribing is heading for disaster. As Dr Phil would say; how’s that working for ya professor? Rising suicides and increased prescribing… sometimes 2+2 really does equal 4.

IHRC Recommendations.

NICE guidelines.

NICE Review Consultation Doc.