psychiatry, Random, Shanes story.

Well-Being Foundation Award

The Well-Being Foundation: “It’s that time of year. Time mag, the IT, the Grauniad, they all do it. We’re not great ones for PoY awards, partly because they exclude so many deserving people, but for once — Leonie Fennell is our Woman of the Year. Hero!” 

Photo Courtesy of Caroline
Photo Courtesy of Caroline

Aw shucks! I’m not quite sure what to say here, except – I’m very proud to accept the ‘Woman of the Year’ award from the Well-Being Foundation. This Foundation was set up by Dr Michael Corry and his partner Aine Tubridy.

Taken from the Well-being website following Dr Corry’s death on 22/02/2010 – “If opposition is any sign, then Michael’s campaigns certainly rattled the ‘great and the good’ of Irish psychiatry. Professor Patricia Casey sued him and RTE for libel in 2005, a case settled by the broadcaster, and Professor Ted Dinan of UCC made a complaint to the Fitness to Practice Committee of the IMC over his public comments on the role of SSRIs (in Shane’s case).” Ah yes, so no surprises there then!

It was a pleasure to meet both of these lovely people, albeit, it goes without saying that I wish it was under different circumstances. I accept this award with enormous pride on behalf of myself and Shane, particularly as it’s coming from the Well-being Foundation. Thank you, and rest in Peace Dr Corry and Aíne Tubridy!

Cuba 12

Dr Corry and Aine Tubridy

Newspaper and internet articles, Random

Declan Henry – Why Bipolar?

Why BipolarDeclan Henry – Why Bipolar?

I have just finished reading ‘Why Bipolar’, a book by Irish author Declan Henry. The purpose of the book is to demystify ‘Bipolar disorder’, the ‘condition’ formerly known as Manic Depression.

This is a great read; a collection of 26 individual stories of people who have had a Bipolar diagnosis. The fact that there are different stories make it a very easy read as it can be put down and read again at leisure. It was lovely to read about my hero Doctor Michael Corry who got a mention in one of the stories. Mary Maddock of MindFreedom Ireland, another hero of mine and a lovely lady, wrote the concluding section of ‘Why Bipolar’ quite beautifully.

Sometimes the stories were harrowing but equally, maybe unintentionally, some were very funny. Wouldn’t it be nice to be ‘mad’ for a day, go on a spending spree, say what you think to whoever you wish and  do exactly what takes your fancy? Going by these stories, not really. Reality will always break through and come crashing round your ankles. Not good!

As I suppose with life, the people were all shapes and sizes, ranging from annoying, sad, self-absorbed to kind, funny and enormously likeable. Most of the 26 people in the book gave account of their diagnosis and again most had been medicated with varying amounts of psychiatric drugs. The strange thing is, that with the exception of one person, the drugs made no difference or made the symptoms much worse.

The takeaway message here is that the pharmaceutical industry is making a mint out of drugs that don’t work, for a condition which may or may not exist. Even worse – the drugs can cause permanent debilitating adverse effects in an already vulnerable person. Anyway, it’s a great read and highly recommended. One last point I took away from this book – if anyone says ‘let me be nice to you‘- RUN!!

Random

Medicating a non-existent disease.

Here’s a recent clip of Sinead O’Connor speaking on her treatment by an Irish Psychiatrist. Sinead says that she was misdiagnosed with Bipolar Disorder and subsequently prescribed ‘toxic’ doses of Lamictal (400mgs) and Amitriptyline (200mgs). She describes her psychiatrist as a horrible ‘b’ who did not inform her of the side-effects while on the drugs, or while coming off them.

Dishing out the pills is always the first-line treatment for people that psychiatry see as ‘abnormal’. Sinead O’Connor is perfectly normal by the way, and fabulously outspoken; she didn’t need fixing! Strange that dangerous drugs can be given to a person for years for an ‘illness’ which didn’t exist. Never mind all that comes with that, not least the weight gain, depersonalization, worsening depression and huge expense; would any other profession get away with such sloppy work? Reported adverse effects of these drugs on the RxISK website: Lamictal and Amitriptyline.

The full video can be viewed here.

Newspaper and internet articles, Random

The Sherif Sultan Saga

Mr ForgetfulThere’s been an interesting development today in the ‘Sherif Sultan’ Saga.

Remember, Mr Sultan is the consultant in Galway who received an official warning from the HSE for speaking out on the dangers of taking statin drugs? This followed the publication of his paper here-The ugly side of Statins. He said what David Healy has been saying for a long time, that he and his colleagues “are fed up with trial of organizations to cover up truth about the ugly side of statin because of invested interest and commercial sponsorship.”

The picture you may think is a random one, but no, it’s a reminder (no pun intended) that the FDA have recently added ‘memory loss’ to the ever growing list of serious statin adverse effects.

So Mr Sultan was slapped with a gagging order (aka ‘STFU’ order) by the HSE. Did he accept this lying down? No he didn’t! Was he willing to keep taking the paycheck and stop warning his patients that statins are dangerous and usually unnecessary? Nope! What he did say was “Odds are greater than 100 to 1 that if you’re taking a statin, you don’t really need it” and further “We are observing the revealing of the ‘utmost medical tragedy’ of all times. It is extraordinary that the healthcare industry has inadvertently induced life-threatening nutrient deficiency in millions of otherwise healthy people.” 

Thankfully the Irish Hospital Consultants Association (IHCA) have stepped in. Replying to the 2 senior executives, the IHCA have asked for the gagging order to be revoked. According to the Irish Independent, the reply states that there is “no provision in a hospital consultant’s contract to check with their employer the content of any comment they want to make to the public” and further that consultants have an “ethical, legal and moral obligation to advocate on behalf of their patients”.

Are we seeing the start of a revolt, an ethical army led by Mr Sultan? I sure hope so. The pharmaceutical influence in the ‘illness’ profession has reigned and dictated for long enough. It’s about time that someone stood up to Goliath. Will it be David again, or Sherif, or hopefully both? Who could have foreseen that the revolution would start in Ireland?

So the next time your doctor insists that you need that box of Pfizer pills or Lilly drug, ask him/her what he thinks of that surgeon in Galway who said “in Healthy patients with no cardiovascular history, statins have no proven benefit – in medical terms no scientific evidence for the use of statin in primary prevention.”

Our story., Random

Westminster Exposé

WestminsterSo myself and the poor long-suffering husband are just back from London, having attended a talk in the House of Commons given by Professor David Healy; ‘Antidepressants and The Politics of Health‘.

The meeting was chaired by MP Jim Dobbins who has previously aired concerns about the pharmaceutical industry and its close involvement within academia, such as the case with Professor David Nuttcase Nutt here. I don’t really have an issue with Professsor Nutt, other than with his false declaration to the Nation (on BBC radio) that ‘it’s impossible to kill yourself with an overdose of SSRI antidepressants‘. Dr Ciara Kelly said the same thing here on Irish radio. Very dangerous propaganda!

I challenged Prof Nutt on his statement (via Twitter) where he changed his story slightly and said ‘ALMOST impossibly’. Tell that to all the people who have died by an SSRI overdose of these ‘safe’ drugs Prof Nutt! Brian at ‘AntiDepAware‘ has a list of some SSRI victims here; Karen Gloster (2005), Barbara BerryDeborah Owens (2006), Rhian Evans (2007), Rodney Harrop (2008), Philip Bromley (2009), Belinda KellyMichael MillerNatalie CashinSusan Mealing (2010), Patrick Carroll (2011), Malcolm AverissRobert Lennon (2012) Donna ChaseMark Cain (2003), Christine ByrneDianne Pickersgill (2008) Dale Pashley (2007), Brian Elder (2010), Afsheen Khan (2011)

Anyway, I’m rambling off the point again this morning. Suffice to say,  as is usual, our trip did not always go as planned. We decided, as we were going to London for this talk, to bring the kids with us and maybe go to Legoland the following day. We had plenty of time as the flight was an early one and the talk wasn’t on until 2pm in Westminster. The Ryanair plane sounded decidedly dodgy, as if it was running on dirty fuel (haha, Tony will tell you I have a good mechanical ear) and unsurprisingly the pilot decided that we would have to change planes. This left us two hours behind schedule so the pressure was on, the kids were happily oblivious but the odds at arriving on time were stacked against us. In stepped my brother-in-law in his superman underpants in order to save the day and meet us in London Bridge. He took the kids to my sisters in Kent (where we were staying with 3 cousins, all girls and under the age of 3). This left us plenty of time to head to Westminster for the talk. Back on track.

There was nothing I could do about the frizzy hair at that stage but I thought I’d better change out of the tracksuit bottoms. I decided I would have to change into my ‘Westminster’ clothes in the toilet on the train. Yep, that sounds like a good idea you think? Thanks, I thought so too. The toilet doors were of the circular kind which we have here in Ireland too. There was a nice man sitting outside the toilet when I went in, who smiled at me and said hello; the English are so polite aren’t they? So I took the boots and tracksuit bottoms off and was standing in my underwear (thank God for small mercies) when the train jolted and I leaned backwards, for balance you understand. I leaned on the open-door button, which promptly left me standing in my knickers exposing myself to the poor man sitting outside. Frantic pressing on the buttons failed to close the doors for a lifetime of seconds, until the doors finally closed on the man’s shocked expression. I debated whether I could stay in the toilets until the man either got off or died from old age, whichever came first, but eventually braved the situation and departed from the toilet where I grinned at him in a stupid fashion. He couldn’t look me in the face and glanced quickly out the window. Oh well, nobody was arrested and Tony’s well used to my little accidents/incidences.

So having laughed our heads off all the way to Westminster, we finally made it with a half an hour to spare. After the talk was over, we retired to another room where a question and answer session took place. Jim Dobbins actually voiced what we all knew all along, that the pharmaceutical industry has the Government over a barrel and if the Govt were to sanction ‘industry’, they would threaten to take their business elsewhere, hence GSK et al having control in the UK. This is no doubt the case in Ireland where industries influence is palpable everywhere. If pharma can have such a huge influence over the UK Government, what chance do we have over here in our small country with a population of 4.5 million citizens and with a proven history of unscrupulously corrupt Ministers? You would have to wonder why Kathleen Lynch and James Reilly have done nothing about SSRI-induced deaths.

LegolandDavid Healy’s talk was brilliant as always. We also had the pleasure of meeting the lovely Brian of AntiDepAware and his equally gorgeous wife. We met with Bobby Fidd which is always a pleasure but who missed the chat afterwards having commandeered my poor husband to go outside for a smoke, and who subsequently both got lost.

The 3 gorgeous girlies under the age of 3 were hilarious, funny and little dotes. I don’t know how any household survives them, but I actually miss them already!

PS. The LegoLand experience was amazing and went without any major incident thankfully. All children accounted for, happy and alive, which is more than I can say for my eldest son’s involvement with Lundbeck pharmaceuticals and some uninformed Irish doctors.

Bob Fiddaman’s account of the meeting can be read here, while Brian’s can be read here.

Cases, cipramil (celexa) stories,, lundbeck, Our story.

Ah Yes; The Lundbeck Salute.

Lundbeck two finger saluteI have always said that I never get angry, but I think I may have to revise that statement. You’d think by the following conversation, that I had lost my purse or something equally trivial, but hey, what’s a son to Lundbeck pharmaceuticals?

Sept 20 2013

Causality Assessment.

RE; My son’s death (Shane Clancy)

To whom it concerns,

It has come to my attention that the CIOMS report which I have received for my son’s death is unfactual. The box marked ‘did event reappear after reintroduction’, is inexplicably blank. As you can see from my son’s medical records which I have attached for your attention, there is clearly a challenge, dechallenge and rechallenge period. The significance of my son’s suicide attempt shortly after his consumption of Citalopram and his completed suicide shortly after rechallenge surely did not go unnoticed by your pharmacovigilance department?
As this seems to be an oversight on Lundbeck’s part, can you rectify this important issue and get back to me and the Irish Medicines Board with another assessment. As I’m sure that deceased children are of huge importance to Lundbeck, this matter is surely one of utmost importance in order to prevent future fatalities.
Regards,
Leonie Fennell
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Reply Sept 25 2013

Dear Ms Fennell,

I refer to your query below concerning the CIOMS report for your son’s case. The CIOMS form was completed in compliance with pharmacovigilance legislation which requires a revision of the form on the receipt of relevant new information. There is no requirement for a revision of the CIOMS form, as the case is considered up-to-date by the Irish Medicines Board.

Yours sincerely,
Medical Department,

Lundbeck (Ireland) Ltd

Newspaper and internet articles, Our story., Random

Wicklow Casper Conference

PresentationWell, I did it. I survived the conference with Maria, I didn’t run out the side door and she didn’t have to slap me; well not too hard anyway. Maria was fabulous and I couldn’t have asked for a more experienced ally.

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She was able to give people a real feel for her son Toran, along with an abundance of science behind drug-induced deaths. The stories we heard on Saturday were tragic and very avoidable, but hopefully we can inform the future generation and stop the madness that SSRIs are inducing. 

Maria is the CEO of Casper NZ. New statistics have shown that in the groups which Casper has helped, there has been a 20% reduction in deaths by suicide. For young people that is a stunning reversal, because in the previous year there had been a 45% increase in 15-19 year olds taking their own lives. That has never been done in Ireland and we need to take notice. Despite all the suicide awareness groups, pharma funded and otherwise, the suicide rate in this country is huge. Maria has been asked to speak in other countries including Dubai, The Cook Islands, Australia and the US. I have no doubt she is making a difference; can we possibly ignore these results or will we just keep over-prescribing the unhappy pills which double the risk of suicide and violence?

PS. Thank you so much to everyone who made a huge effort to attend, from all over the country and indeed from across the water. I am humbled! Video to follow once my son Jake gets his act together and posts to Youtube.

Cases, cipramil (celexa) stories,, lundbeck

Panorama – Citalopram Causes Birth Defects

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Despite the evidence uncovered by Panorama, Lundbeck ( at 25 mins), never a company to shy away from another lie, stated – “Citalopram does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of major fetal malformations.” The two unfortunate Irish babies who are logged into the Irish Medicine’s Board database are not worth a mention then? Ah yes, just a couple of damaged and dead babies to add to Citalopram’s collateral damage list! The late John McCarthy put it perfectly “how do these people sleep?

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cipramil (celexa) stories,, lundbeck, Newspaper and internet articles

Panorama Expose on Citalopram use in Pregnancy.

Unhappy pill

Next week BBC’s Panorama team are tackling the issue of antidepressant use in pregnancy. The programme will be broadcast on Mon 1st july, entitled ‘The Truth About Pills and Pregnancy‘.

According to the UK Independent “The programme will broadcast an interview with Anna Wilson, whose son David spent the first five weeks of his life in hospital. A 20-week scan had shown that David had a heart defect and would need surgery immediately after being born. Anna had been taking the prescription drug Citalopram to treat her anxiety four years before her pregnancy began, and was told that she was safe to continue whilst pregnant. The show will feature interviews with Prof Pilling, who will say that GP prescription guidelines are about to be updated to take into account evidence suggesting a link with SSRIs and heart defects.”

A manufacturer contacted by the BBC denies any link to major foetal malformations (no prizes for guessing Lundbeck here).

Panorama spoke to eight mothers who had babies born with serious heart defects after taking a commonly used SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) antidepressant while pregnant.

An article on BBC News stated “Lundbeck, the manufacturer of Citalopram, said a recent review of scientific literature concluded that the drug ‘does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of major foetal malformations’.”

It seems that Lundbeck are lying again or there is a serious lack of communication between the various medicines regulators and the pharmaceutical industry. Below is an adverse reaction report logged with the Irish Medicines Board involving a baby born with a Cleft Lip, associated with the mother’s use of Citalopram.

IMB 1

What about the following, also reported as Citalopram induced? This particular report concerns the intrauterine death of an unborn baby due to ‘Citalopram exposure during pregnancy’.

IMB 3

Then there was our meeting in Copenhagen with the two Lundbeck goons. We asked if Citalopram/Escitalopram was a teratogen. Their answers (or non-answers) may surprise you…

Leonie                       Right, will I go on because there’s no point, we’re stuck at that one?  Anyway.  Do you think that it’s advisable to virtually bathe foetuses in Serotonin given it is now accepted this family of drugs are firmly associated with birth defects?

Dr. Madsen               Virtually bathe?

Leonie                       Foetuses in Serotonin – pregnancy.

Tony                         Pregnant women.

Dr. Madsen               I don’t know what you mean by virtually bathe

Leonie                       I’m talking about anti-depressants are known to cause birth defects.  If you think so, would it not be better if women of child-bearing age were cautioned against, perhaps even contra-indicated from using this drug?  Citalopram or Escitalopram?

Dr. Madsen               Em, I think in…..

Leonie                       Your views?

Dr. Madsen               In pregnancy?

Leonie                       Yeah

Dr. Madsen               Em, I think em, physicians need to double their efforts to make sure that there is a correct risk versus eh, benefit eh, assessment of the em, of any action.

Leonie                       Is Citalopram and Escitalopram a teratogen?

Dr. Madsen               Em, meaning, what, what, what do you mean?

Leonie                       Can it cause harm to foetuses? Unborn babies.

Dr. Madsen               Em, obviously, in order to have our compounds approved we have done em, a large number of pre-clinical trials em, and we are constantly monitoring and the eh, while the recommendation I believe throughout, is to be, be extra cautious when administering any eh, medications to pregnant women…

Leonie                       Can it cause harm?….. to unborn babies?

Dr. Madsen               Anything can cause harm, can cause harm in any dose

Leonie                       So yes it can.

Dr. Madsen               depending on dose

Leonie                       Yep

Em, why if it can cause harm, is this not clearly, clearly stated on the packaging and information leaflet?

Mr. Schroll                Do you talk about the patient leaflet or do you talk about the SPC, the label that the Doctors use in order to prescribe the medication?

Leonie                       I’m talking about a pregnant woman that goes down and gets it in the chemist.  Is it on the patient information leaflet?

Mr. Schroll                In the patient leaflet it says you have to talk to your Doctor….

Leonie                       And what does it say in the Doctor’s leaflet?

Mr. Schroll                That he has to be extra cautious.  I think that if you go to the… to, to the Irish home page, I believe it is like that, it’s like that in Denmark and elsewhere.  If you go to the medicines agency authorities

Leonie                       So,

Mr. Schroll                the medicines agency authorities you can see what is in the checks that the Doctors and that is up to them to decide…..

Leonie                       So you are passing the buck back to the Doctor again.

Mr. Schroll                I think when it’s prescription medication, yes.  If it was eh, eh,

Leonie                       And will they be told that it can harm their unborn baby?

Mr. Schroll                Sorry?

Leonie                       Will the pregnant woman be told that the drug can, can harm her unborn baby?

Mr. Schroll                It would be part of the discussion to talk about the risks and the benefits and that would be up to the Doctor.

Leonie                       It would be up to the Doctor to tell them that the drug can harm their unborn baby?

Mr. Schroll                Eh, now, you’re talking…..

Leonie                       It’s not up to Lundbeck, no?  It’s up to the Doctor to tell the woman that the drug can harm their unborn baby?

Mr. Schroll                To be cautious, yes, yes.

The Irish word ‘amadáin’ springs to mind. I could think of a few English ones too but think I’d better refrain. The Panorama programme should be excellent viewing as usual, particularly with Shelley Jofre as reporter. She did the previous expose concerning GSK and Seroxat suicides. I can see her putting Lundbeck in their place.

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Lundbeck Meeting here.

IMB adverse reaction reports.

MHRA (UK) adverse reaction reports.

cipramil (celexa) stories,, lundbeck

Be Aware/Beware of Lundbeck’s ’99 and me’

Shane, Lucy and ChrissyLundbeck, your not so friendly Pharma company are at it again in the Irish Isles. This time it’s the launch of a ‘new bipolar disorder campaign’ 99 and me.

What does the ’99 and me’ leaflet tell us? Well, let’s see: “Seeking help for symptoms of bipolar disorder is no cause for worry. Approximately 40,000 people in Ireland are currently being treated for the condition – that is approximately 1 in every 100 people in the country. Your healthcare professional is always on-hand to offer friendly advice and support. They can advise you on the right treatment pathway to suit you.”

The campaign, according to IrishHealth.com, “aims to tackle misunderstandings about the condition, to remove the stigma surrounding it and to encourage people to get the treatment they need as soon as possible.” Dr Paul Scully of St James’s Hospital stated “not infrequently, bipolar can be misdiagnosed as depression and, as a result, patients don’t receive the treatment and support they need“.

Naturally Lundbeck have a treatment for bi-polar disorder. Unfortunately the treatment may be worse than the cure; will your hands-on friendly healthcare professional tell you that? Firstly there is Sycrest/Saphris which lists Akathisia as a ‘common’ side effect. Akathisia, you may know, is well known as the precursor to suicide and/or homicide.

Then there is Abilify. According to PharmaTimes the ‘National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’ (NICE) “has issued draft guidance recommending Lundbeck/Otsuka’s Abilify for the treatment of teenagers with bipolar disorder.” Remember Akathisia, particularly if this drug is prescribed to your teenager. The RxISK database has 348 reported deaths, 573 cases of Akathisia, 572 cases of Psychotic disorder, 381 cases of Agitation, 351 cases of Schizophrenia, 303 cases of mania, 303 cases of Delusion, 292 cases of Hallucination, 295 Suicide attempts, 293 Completed suicide and 276 cases of Aggression, all directly reported as an adverse effect of consuming Abilify. I could go on but you can have a look for yourself: RxISK (Abilify)

At the moment there is a Bi-polar Conference (13-16 June) ongoing in Florida. It’s called the ’10th International Conference on Bipolar Disorders’ and the listed disclosures would make your hair stand on end, here. Interesting to see the notorious pharma shill Charles Nemeroff in attendance. Despite the numerous conflicts of interest, at least in the US pharma declarations are listed, where-as Irish Psychiatrists and Doctors seem quite reticent in revealing their pharma connections. It would certainly be interesting to see what pharma connections, if any, Dr Paul Scully of St James’s Hospital has, including Lundbeck honoraria.

It should be noted; in my experience, if you or your loved one happen to have an adverse reaction (as listed above), your hands-on friendly GP will side with the pharmaceutical industry and turn their backs on you quicker than you can say ‘Judas Iscariot’.